Don't have an account? Sign up for Free

{{ messages }}
View as: List Masonry

Eco-Friendly Virginia Wedding

Vintage Weddings

Photos by:

We’re always so tickled when we hear a photographer say their couple found him through Ruffled! Precious couple Jenny and Keith ran into the misfortune of rain (and tornado warnings!) on their wedding day, but the pictures from Gabe Aceves make it evident the newlyweds didn’t let the rain put a damper on their day. Bride Jenny was even fortunate enough to have two pairs of bright red shoes on hand — wedding day flats and lifesaver wellies! Have you ever seen a couple so smitten with each other? Enjoy the rest of the images in the gallery and make sure you check out the bride and groom’s cute blog!

rainy vintage virginia wedding

From the bride, Jenny: Neither of us had ever really considered the actual details of getting married -– it seemed so easy when we were scheming our imaginary ideal wedding day before it became a reality! So we started planning the big day on a bit of a back foot -– and looking through false-veneered bridal magazines were sadly not of any help. The main thing we focused on was that it was important for us to have something personal that utilized our creative talents, and with that came the acceptance that things were not really going to follow the conventional route of traditional weddings. The big things for us were doing a lot of things DIY, making our wedding environmentally friendly, exploring our love of all things vintage, making sure we had enough time with our close friends and family, and never losing that “sense of self” that really makes the best weddings special.

rainy vintage virginia weddingrainy vintage virginia wedding

rainy vintage virginia wedding

The color scheme was something we both had trouble deciding on. All I knew was that we wanted a “vintage spring feel” and that didn’t necessarily come with it’s own Pantone number. The theme was “vintage adventure,” and having happily found inspiration on several blogs that seemed to “get” what we wanted (including Ruffled!), we started by gathering picture references to start crafting out what we wanted. As two creative people well-versed in planning events on a shoestring budget (we both worked for an indie record label, it’s a necessity), to keep costs down we decided to do many things ourselves when it came to the “look” of the wedding –- from the invites and website to the table decorations, menus, seating placements and cake topper.

rainy vintage virginia weddingrainy vintage virginia wedding

rainy vintage virginia wedding

Keith is the graphics master, so he handled all the design aspects of the wedding, taking the feel of what we wanted for the style and running with it, designing the invites, website, menus and even “Welcome brochures” for our guests staying in the area all consistent (my dad later referred to this in his father of the bride speech as “building our own brand”!) While the big things like venue/food were inevitably the most important, I am a details person and for us it was the little things that really brought the wedding to life. We had a “Treats” table filled with candy that guests could put in hand rubber stamped bags, in lieu of favors. We had a vintage suitcase with parcel tags with guests names on, to guide them to their seats, and matching tag place settings that, unplanned by us, many guests attached to themselves as name tags during the night.

rainy vintage virginia weddingrainy vintage virginia wedding

rainy vintage virginia wedding

rainy vintage virginia weddingrainy vintage virginia wedding

All the plates and silverware were made of sustainable and recyclable bamboo. The gifts table had a vintage suitcase with a mini “Thank you” banner on it for cards, and an illuminated globe. Each table was named after a place of significance for Keith and I, with the story of its relevance typed in Ikea frames that we “distressed” to look vintage. We had postcards on each table with a blue mason jar of colored pencils for guests to write messages to us instead of a guest book, that they hung on a string of beads hanging in the reception hall. People blew bubbles for our exit down the aisle instead of confetti. Although at times it felt that we were in the middle of a 5-year-old’s birthday party rather than a wedding, I think it only added to the fun (and the open bar helped).

rainy vintage virginia wedding

rainy vintage virginia weddingrainy vintage virginia wedding

rainy vintage virginia wedding

Any advice for brides planning their weddings now? While you may be able to do everything yourselves, don’t feel you need to. Try to stay focused on the reason you are doing this in the first place -– because you love each other and want to start your life together -– and not get too buried by the sheer wall of baffling bridal nonsense that so often sends brides (and grooms)-to-be crazy. Stay true to what you want -– it’s your day after all. Even if you’re an unconventional bride, it’s ok to spend time on yourself making sure you have everything you want, and that you both are happy with how you look, even if it feels a little self-indulgent — the photos will stay with you for life.

rainy vintage virginia wedding

rainy vintage virginia weddingrainy vintage virginia wedding

Don’t dwell on the people who can’t be there and why, put your attention on the people that made the effort to come. Make sure your inclement weather plan includes an umbrella that will look good in pictures. What is right for one couple may not be right for you, so remember the people you have coming to share the big day will roll with whatever you want to do. And plan an open bar. Whatever worries you have and gripes guests might get will be washed away after a few free drinks!

rainy vintage virginia wedding

Gabe Aceves make it evident the newlyweds didn’t let the rain put a damper on their day. Bride Jenny was even fortunate enough to have two pairs of bright red shoes on hand — wedding day flats and lifesaver wellies! Have you ever seen a couple so smitten with each other? Enjoy the rest of the images in the See the rest of the wedding here

Wedding Songs:
Processional: Ingrid Michaelson, “Can’t Help Falling In Love”
Readings: Ryan Adams, “My Love For You Is Real”
Recessional: Starship, “Nothing’s Gonna Stop Us Now”
Bridal party’s reception entrance: “Mariachi El Bronx”
Bride and groom’s reception entrance: Huey Lewis and the News, “Power of Love”
First dance: The Swell Season/The Frames, “Falling Slowly”

Wedding vendors (Middleburg, VA):

Ceremony and reception venue: Briar Patch Bed & Breakfast Inn / Wedding photographer: Gabe Aceves / Wedding Coordinator: Henriette Buell of Buelltiful Events / Flower arrangements: family friend / Wedding dress: Dolly Couture / Bridesmaids’ dresses: Courtesan Boutique / Groom’s suit: Calvin Klein / Groomlady’s dress: Moon Collection / Felt boutonnieres: made by bride / Wedding musician: Matt Moody / Wedding catering: Barn Door BBQ / Wedding cake: Market Salamander / Wedding invitations: done by groom

Postcards and Love Notes

Engagement Sessions

Photos by:

This cute engagement session comes to us from Wildflowers Photography, and I just love the couple’s story! The bride collects many vintage pieces, including the blue glass collection featured. The groom has helped add to her collection of vintage – by writing her love letters on the backs of vintage postcards! Another cute detail: their good friend owns the Model A and the antique store called Fishy Finds in Simi Valley, CA.

 daisy wedding ideas

 vintage car wedding ideas

 vintage postcard collection

 vintage car engagement

 purple pink wedding ideas

 vintage postcards hanging clothesline

 vintage junkyard engagement session

 antique store editorial photos

 thrift store engagement session

 vintage library wedding

 antique store engagement session

 thread twine wedding ideas

Have a great weekend!

DIY Vintage Save-the-Date

DIY Projects

Photos by:

I am beyond thrilled to be a guest blogger for Brides Magazine today! This save-the-date project I created is so easy, it almost feels wrong! With the same concept, you can make menus, escort cards and place cards stamped on nearly anything. Think vintage hankies, napkins, kraft paper, … any flat surface will do (be sure to buy metal/glass ink pad if you’re stamping on hard surfaces).


With a stamp kit from Staples (about $25 with ink pad), I created this simple save-the-date card using vintage postcards I found on eBay. Craigslist is a magical place for postcard lots if you have time and patience to wait for a local listing. There you can find large lots for next to nothing!

Alternating between the large and the small fonts, I placed the letters on the stamp with the help of the tweezers that come with it. Luckily, you only place the letters once – once that’s ready it’s a breeze! You can also use the smaller stamp for your return address on the envelopes. It will match the font on the save-the-dates and give a crisp vintage vibe! See the entire blog post here.

And while we’re at it, stay tuned for our second annual DIY Contest — coming soon!

DIY Vintage Postcard Save-the-Date

DIY Projects

Photos by:

Only one week left to enter our DIY Contest! Simply use an old/used item in a DIY project and send me 4-6 photos (600 pixels wide), instructions and a list of materials to amanda @ruffledblog.com. The first place winner will receive $500, and the second place winner a $100 gift certificate to Wendy Mink Jewelry, so get cracking!

Our next participant is Heather, who recycled vintage postcards and used them as save-the-date cards. She shares how she removed the ink on used postcards, but this can be a quick project if you have unused vintage postcards.

DIY Vintage Postcard Save-the-Date

– Vintage postcards – they can be found at most antique stores…some searching is required, but that’s part of the fun. Postcards that have never been used are most desirable, but those are pretty hard to find, so those written on with ball point pen or pencil are best as a second choice.
– Bleach
– Q-tips
– Rubber gloves
– Paper towels
– A pot used to boil water.
– Typewriter (optional).

The postcards before:
DIY Vintage Postcard Save-the-Date
and after:
DIY Vintage Postcard Save-the-Date
Instructions:

First, find your postcards. You may want to get a few more than you actually need. In doing this project I found that some of the postcards that looked like they would be the easiest to clean up were actually impossible to clean and were unusable. Save yourself a trip and just get a few extras at the beginning.

Secondly, the postcards need to be prepared. To remove the stamp: Boil water on the stove until it starts to steam. Hold the postcard over the steam to loosen stamp (this may take 5 minutes or so) and remove the stamp with tweezers. I suggest removing the stamps first so that you can avoid having the ink on your save the date message running!

Next, the postcards need to be cleaned of any old writing. Postcards that were written on with pencil are the easiest because they can usually just be erased. To remove ballpoint pen ink: put on rubber gloves, get out bleach, q-tips, and a paper towel which has been run under water and then rung out so that it is slightly damp. Dip one q-tip in bleach and run the q-tip along each line of text. The ink should start to disappear. After bleaching a few rows of text, wipe the postcard clean with the damp paper towel. Continue this process until the ink is gone. It may take a few swipes, and some ink may not come off at all. The postmark will not be removed, but I think having the old postmark is one of the best things about these save the date cards.

Finally, type out your message! You’ll need to keep it simple as there is not a lot of room on old postcards, but we were able to include all necessary information. The postcards don’t have to be typed out on a typewriter, although it does add to the authenticity of the postcards. I went out and bought a typewriter to do these save the dates because I knew I would use it in the future. Some libraries still provide usage of typewriters.

These save the date cards take time, but in my opinion, they’re worth it. Because most of them can be found for between 25 cents and 1 dollar they tend to be cheaper than normal save the dates, and they can be mailed for 28 cents instead of the usual 44 cents.